Perseverative, Obsessive & Upsetting Behaviors

These are a few examples of how perseverative behaviors may present themselves either in school or at home. 

Perseveration is an uncontrolled repetition or continuation of a response or behavior. It may seem as though your child or student is fixated on a particular topic or activity. 

In a classroom setting, a student may fixate on perfecting the way they write their letters and numbers, sometimes erasing and rewriting them a dozen times. Or perhaps your student or child is really interested in a particular topic and prefers to only talk about that topic, excluding all others. 

If you’re looking for resources to help your child or student work through these behaviors, try a social (behavior) story or utilize one of our PowerPoint presentations on various topics and behaviors that may occur. In addition to perseverative behaviors, we also have materials to manage obsessive behaviors. 

These behavior stories may benefit your students.  They can be downloaded, saved and edited to suit your needs.  The * notation indicates the story is  formatted in a Power Point presentation and the ** notation indicates a Power Point with sound narration.  Each Power Point has animation included on each slide.  Some occur automatically – some occur on a “click”.  Feel free to send comments or questions to [email protected]

Walking Inside – It’s OK says Sid the Science Kid

Anxiety

Don’t Be Bothered by Little Things

Hair Pulling

It’s OK

My Fingers

Someone is Crying*

Someone is Crying

When Things Go Wrong*

Writing with a Pencil

Worries*

Sticky Thinking

Sticky Thinking*

When there is an Emergency*

Be Gentle with Babies

Bugs and People’s Personalities

Flushing Toilets

Getting Better

My Letters Don’t Have to be Perfect

Dreamcatchers

Everybody Thinks Differently*

Everybody Thinks Differently

How to Keep Princess Hair Clip Art (Topic: Hair Pulling Disorder, Clip Art Illustrations)

How to Keep Princess Hair (Topic: Hair Pulling Disorder, Template for Personalized Photos)

If you have questions or concerns about the Watson Institute’s use of this information, please contact us.