Resources to Support Challenging Child Behavior

Preparing for Visitors
Situation: 

I am going to visit my non-verbal, six year old grandson. I only see him once a year in his “space” but he knows me from Skype. I always try to approach him gently until he acknowledges me. What are some tips on making this process easier for him? I only have one week with him and want to love him to pieces while I’m there.

Consequence Flow Chart
Situation: 

I have a student in my class who becomes upset over the smallest problem at recess. He’ll cry or throw things when something doesn’t go his way on the playground. The other kids have obviously noticed this and are starting to stay away from him. How do I help him understand that what he says and does directly affects his relationship with others?

Strategies for Receptive Language Challenges
Situation: 

My son has issues with receptive speech. When I tell him something, like this morning I was trying to tell him we would have cheerios for breakfast and eggs for lunch, all he could hear was he wasn’t getting cheerios right now. I kept repeating “we will have cheerios and then eggs after” but he still was not hearing me and continued to cry and scream. I then put him on the table at eye-level and validated him by saying “I will get you cheerios” but I couldn’t explain to him that we would have eggs after. My son will be 4 in May and this is probably the most frustrating thing we deal with on a daily basis…

Teaching Children Home & School Routines
Situation: 

The Watson Institute has received a number of questions from parents searching for resources to teach their child how to complete various tasks with greater independence or how to set routines for their child. For example, one parent noted that her daughter had difficulty staying focused while getting ready for bed in the evenings. She was looking for a resource to help her stay focused and be more independent. Another parent asked about teaching their son to brush his teeth before bedtime and incorporate that into his daily morning and evening routines.

We’ve also heard from educators looking for ways to support their students with exceptionalities who may have difficulty following along during activities or particular classes.

Managing Behaviors in Public Settings
Situation: 

The Watson Institute has received a number of questions from parents looking for resources to help them manage their child’s behavior in various public settings. Community activities such as going to church, visiting the library, going out to eat, and going to a doctor’s appointment have been our most requested topics.

Families are seeking help with preventing behavioral meltdowns while in these public settings.

Interrupt and Redirect: For Toddler Throwing
Situation: 

My two year old throws everything on the floor and lately picks up a toy, an object, whatever, and throws it at me. How can I help him correct his behavior?

Decreasing Self-Injurious Behaviors
Situation: 

I am a graduate student doing a case study on a 6 year old boy with autism. His mother reported that he often causes harm to his own body frequently. What are some strategies to reduce self-injurious behaviors?

 

Reinforcement Tower
Situation: 

One of my 4th grade students has high functioning autism and is included in regular education most of his day. His teachers are complaining that his “talk outs” during class are becoming much too disruptive. We are looking for a positive reinforcement procedure that might work better than his current system, which is a basic star chart that he doesn’t like.

PREVENT: Blowing Nose Without a Tissue
Situation: 

I am a Life Skills teacher and have a 2nd grade student with autism who will often blow out “boogies” without getting a tissue. He will do this several times a day and it often soils the table or other classroom items. Do you have any ideas of how to stop this somewhat gross behavior? He does have the ability to get a tissue and blow his nose as we have taught the behavior and he has demonstrated that he can do it with both a verbal or picture prompt on occasion.

Mealtime Strategies
Situation: 

I often hear about children having a limited number of foods they will eat. My son is starting to have some problems during meals. Are there some things I can do before I start having eating issues?