Resources to Support Challenging Child Behavior

Countoons: A Tool for Self Monitoring
Situation: 

I teach elementary students in a resource room. It seems like I have a few students who repeatedly talk out or need constant prompting to get to work. Do you have any strategies I might use that could help…I am struggling to keep it together.

Talk About It Later Journal
Situation: 

I have a student with high functioning autism in my class and he often gets stuck on something that happened and wants to tell me about it in the middle of a lesson or when I am talking with somebody else. He doesn’t seem to “let it go” unless I address it immediately, and if I don’t, he starts to whine and sometimes yell. Sometimes I just can’t take the time to discuss the matter when he wants to…any ideas?

Green Dot to Red Dot: Visual Chunking Strategy to Teach Classwork Independence
Situation: 

One of the students in my Learning Support class requires prompting and reassurance for every problem on his math worksheet.  I want him to complete tasks more independently but he is constantly asking me for help or if his answer is correct.  I can’t work with other students who also need my help with all of these interruptions.  Do you have any suggestions?

Need Help Eraser
Situation: 

I have a student with behavioral challenges who refuses to ask for help when he gets stuck on a problem. I am his regular education teacher but there is an aide in the classroom to assist him. I don’t think he wants to stand out from his peers or “look stupid”. Eventually he gets frustrated, then we see behavior problems that disrupt the class. Any ideas?

Sound Sleep Strategies
Situation: 

My child typically fights going to bed, thinking of more and more activities to do to prevent bedtime from occurring. Once he is settled in bed, I have to stay until he falls asleep. He often wakes during the night or is up very early.  I am exhausted, what can I do?

Auditory Sensitivity Toolkit
Situation: 

My 7 year old is strangely tuned in to certain sounds. For example, if the pages of a book are being turned within hearing distance, he reacts by screaming at the offender to stop it. He is agitated by the noise to the point of having to leave the proximity so he doesn’t continue to fixate on it. When someone who has dry hands rubs them together and he can hear it, it gives him the “willies” and chills. Yesterday at a restaurant, I reached to pull a napkin out of a dispenser , and he reacted by slinking down in the booth saying, “Great! Thanks a lot –I just lost my appetite from you doing that.” He couldn’t finish his toasted cheese sandwich. Another example is that he reacts loudly when paper is being ripped or a sheet of paper is being torn from perforations in a spiral bound notebook. When my long fingernails scratch against him, or I scratch my own itch, it drives him crazy.

How can our family help minimize these seemingly over-the-top reactions to what seem like innocuous sounds–besides the obvious removal of known triggers? Should we be concerned?

The Chewing Child
Situation: 

My student chews anything he can.  He will chew anything that is on his desk like his pencil or eraser.  He chews on his shirt sometimes and often his fingernails.  What can I do to stop this behavior?

Decreasing Self-Stimulatory Behavior
Situation: 

I have a student in my Multi-Disability Classroom who insists on flapping pieces of paper – he won’t go anywhere without the paper – if he doesn’t have a piece he will search in the trash cans or use his work papers. He is integrated into some classrooms and just uses the class papers to flap. What can I do to extinguish this behavior?

Help for Impulsive Responding
Situation: 

I have a 4th grade student who continually raises her hand to answer questions in class. She has ADHD and can be very oppositional and disruptive. When I do call on her, she often answers incorrectly which leads to her slamming her desk, pouting, yelling or sometimes cursing aloud. I love that she is so willing to participate but hesitate to call on her anymore. Do you have any ideas?

Replacement Behavior Tools: Perseverative Behaviors
Situation: 

I teach high school math to life skills students. I have one student who continually calls out phrases in a perseverative manner. She also intermittently claps her hands. The other students in the class get upset and yell for her to “cut it out”. She is a good and caring student.  However, her behaviors interfere with the class and result in negative interactions with her peers. Additionally, she frequently asks for adult help or to have her work checked. All of these behaviors can be exhausting for the adults in the room by the end of the period.  Any suggestions?