Resources to Support Challenging Child Behavior

Substitutions for Sensory Seeking Screams
Situation: 

My son is non-verbal.  Recently he has begun screaming.  This is not out of anger, but to hear his own voice.  It is quite loud and can be very distracting at home to his siblings and out in public.  I don’t want to discourage his trying to communicate, so am not sure how to handle it.

Talk Tools vs. Screaming Tools to Communicate
Situation: 

My son is non-verbal.  Recently he has begun screaming.  This is not out of anger, but to hear his own voice.  It is quite loud and can be very distracting at home to his siblings and out  in public.  I don’t want to discourage his trying to communicate, so am not sure how to handle it.

Timing of Attention to Decrease Screaming
Situation: 

My son is non-verbal.  Recently he has begun screaming.  This is not out of anger, but to hear his own voice.  It is quite loud and can be very distracting at home to his siblings and out in public.  I don’t want to discourage his trying to communicate, so am not sure how to handle it.

Embedding Sensory Input into the Classroom
Situation: 

How do I provide sensory breaks to a child during a busy classroom day without the child leaving his/her desk and missing important instructional time?

Mini-Schedule: Doctor’s Office
Situation: 

How can I help our trips to the doctor’s office become less traumatic? It seems like each time we go there is a meltdown.

Mini-Schedule: Toothbrushing
Situation: 

How can I get my son to brush his teeth when he is getting ready for bed? I have to tell him what to do for every step even though he knows how to do this.

Mini-Schedules: PE/Gym Class
Situation: 

I have a student that comes to my physical education class a couple times a week and repeatedly asks questions like, “what are we doing today, now what, what do I do when am I finished”? I don’t have time to answer him every time he has a question – what can I do?

Perspective-Taking Visual
Situation: 

I have a student who tends to make comments to classmates and teachers that result in hurt feelings, confusion, and ultimately avoidance (i.e. “Your shirt is ugly”, “This is stupid”, etc.) He seems to want to make friends and be liked by his teachers and classmates but these comments are really bothering the people around him. How can I help this student understand how his behavior affects others?

Proximity and Questions
Situation: 

What do I do when my student keeps her head in her desk playing when I’m teaching and the class is doing a worksheet? She won’t answer me when I correct her.

Seat Sheet and Collector Cards: Restaurant
Situation: 

My son will not sit when we go out to a restaurant. He continually tries to crawl under the table or run away from the table. What can we do to make going out to eat easier?