Visual Field Trip Follow Up Form

Definition:

A Visual Field Trip Follow-up form is a one-page pictorial summary of things the students might have seen on their field trip. Students circle pictures or words of things they liked and things they learned about as a way to review and remember their experience.

Situation:

Our Life Skills class is fortunate enough to go on monthly field trips – to the grocery store, the zoo, the library, the museum, etc. We do prepare the students before we go so that they know what to expect, but I feel that I should do some follow-up activity afterwards. Any ideas?

  • Situation

    Our Life Skills class is fortunate enough to go on monthly field trips – to the grocery store, the zoo, the library, the museum, etc. We do prepare the students before we go so that they know what to expect, but I feel that I should do some follow-up activity afterwards. Any ideas?

  • Summary

    Try a Visual Field Trip Follow-up form to determine how your students benefitted from the experience. Students can circle pictures and/or words of different things they saw on their trip, things they liked, and things they learned, and so on.

  • Definition

    A Visual Field Trip Follow-up form is a one-page pictorial summary of things the students might have seen on their field trip. Students circle pictures or words of things they liked and things they learned about as a way to review and remember their experience.

  • Quick Facts
    • Child's Age: 6-10, 11-13
    • Planning Effort: Low
    • Difficulty Level: Easy
  • Pre-requisites

    none

  • Process
    1. Create a simple one-page form with pictures of things commonly found at your destination BEFORE you go on the field-trip. You can add to it once you get back, but the bulk of the work will already be done. For example, a field trip to the grocery store might include pictures of the parking lot, the store sign, the automatic entrance doors, the cart, the different store departments, food items, cashier and register, etc.

    2. After the field trip, share the form with students and help them recall their favorite parts of the experience. Have them circle the appropriate words and/or pictures, then talk about what they circled and why.

    3. Make copies of the completed forms to send home to the students’ families so that they can share in the experience also!

  • Documents and Related Resources

    Developing Leisure Time Skills in Persons with Autism   (Link to website)

     

     

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