Visible But Unreachable

Definition:

This is a strategy for initiating spontaneous language by placing a highly preferred object in sight of the student, but not easily attainable without involving communication with an adult. For example, the teacher knows that the computer is a student’s favorite activity. She takes the mouse and hangs it on a hook above the computer and out of his reach. She waits for him to say something before she gives him the mouse.

Situation:
I can’t get my student to request something without providing a verbal prompt or model. He is so dependent on me and waits until I ask him to talk.
  • Situation
    I can’t get my student to request something without providing a verbal prompt or model. He is so dependent on me and waits until I ask him to talk.
  • Summary
    Using the child’s highly preferred toys, foods, and objects, place each item in a clear plastic bag or container and hang the container/bag so the child can see it but cannot reach it. The student needs to initiate communication in order to obtain the item.
  • Definition

    This is a strategy for initiating spontaneous language by placing a highly preferred object in sight of the student, but not easily attainable without involving communication with an adult. For example, the teacher knows that the computer is a student’s favorite activity. She takes the mouse and hangs it on a hook above the computer and out of his reach. She waits for him to say something before she gives him the mouse.

  • Quick Facts
    • Child's Age: 3-5, 6-10, 11-13, 14-17, 18+
    • Planning Effort: Low
    • Difficulty Level: Easy
  • Pre-requisites

    Child’s ability to discriminate between objects

  • Process
    1. Assess the child’s interests.

    2. Place highly preferred item(s) in a clear container or plastic bag. Hang the item(s) within the child’s eyesight but out of his reach.

    3. When the child initiates by pointing, reaching or saying a word(s), give him the requested item.

  • Documents and Related Resources

     

     

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